Sonnet is a new gadget that does the seemingly impossible… enable you to communicate miles apart in a place void of cell coverage, internet access or even satellites.  And no, it doesn’t use tiny smoke signals.  Sonnet makes use of a technology that has been around for decades, 2-way radios (like in walkie-talkies), and brings it to the next stage of evolution.

It starts by connecting your smartphone to the device’s wifi hotspot and launching the self-hosted program in your browser.  No app required.  Then you can send text, voice recordings, GPS coordinates and even images via Sonnet, which converts them into encrypted radio signals and sends them to the receiving Sonnet, which outputs to the other person’s phone.  The current range is about 3 miles, but Sonnets can also be chained together to form a mesh network, where the data is daisy-chained along until it meets the specified person.

If you feel like you’re living a scene out of The Revenant, there’s a built in SOS mode that will transmit your GPS coordinates to any Sonnet users within range. What good are GPS coordinates without the internet?  Well, Sonnet includes offline maps that allow you to view your location and even leave virtual breadcrumbs.

If all those congratulatory selfies at the top of Mount Denali drained your battery when you need it most, Sonnet has you covered with a nifty built in USB charger.

Sonnet can currently be preordered at its Kickstarter page for $89, which gets you two units.

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